MISTAKES YOU MIGHT BE MAKING IN THE FIRST 10 MINUTES OF YOUR WORKING DAY

The first few minutes of your workday are critical to your productivity for the next eight hours.

If you show up late to the office or get engrossed into an overflowing inbox, you could be thrown off and have time focusing for the rest of the day.

Some common traps can reduce your productivity within the first 10 minutes of your workday.

Getting in late – You could be damaging your workday before it even begins. Giving you lower performance ratings.

Not greeting your co-workers – You can set a pleasant tone for yourself and others around you by taking a few minutes to catch up with your colleagues.

Drinking coffee – The best time to drink coffee is after 9:30am this is because the stress hormone cortisol, which regulates energy, generally peaks between 8 and 9am.

Answering every email in your inbox – Checking your email can become one of those tasks that make it feel like you are accomplishing things, where you are actually in danger of not attending to priority tasks on your agenda.

Launching into your work without a schedule – Write down your top priorities and must-dos for the day and reviewing your calendar. Check to see what events you may have planned and whether you need to prepare for any calls or conferences. Otherwise, you could be caught off guard.

Doing the easiest tasks first – Your energy and will power tend to flag as the day goes on. That is why it is crucial to get the important stuff out of the way as soon as possible.

Multitasking – Because you have so much energy in the morning, you might feel like you can do a million different things at once.

Dwelling on negative thoughts – Maybe you nearly got pushed over by a passenger on the commute, or perhaps you had a fight with your partner the night before. You should not let those experiences distract you from the tasks that need to be done today.

Having a meeting – Morning meetings are a waste of your cognitive resources. If you can make sure they’re scheduled for low energy times like the mid-afternoon, unless you know they require a ton of mental energy.

Not following a routine – If you spend time at the beginning of the workday trying to decide what to do next you will have less mental energy left to sit down and work on that project proposal later. Sticking to a routine lets your brain run on automatic for a while, so that you barely use any mental energy.

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